Governor Wolf Announces $78.3 Million Investment in Water Infrastructure Projects in 12 Counties

Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced the investment of $78.3 million for twelve drinking water, wastewater and non-point source projects across twelve counties through the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PENNVEST).

“The PENNVEST Board of Directors has once again come to the aid of a number of communities across the Commonwealth where safe and adequate drinking water is needed and where both human and animal waste is contaminating local streams”, said Governor Wolf. ”These conditions simply cannot be allowed to continue and I applaud the Board’s efforts and its initiative in addressing these conditions. Pennsylvania is a safer, healthier and more environmentally pleasing place to live as a result.”

Of the $78.3 million, $60.3 million is allocated for low-interest loans and $18.0 million is awarded through grants.

The funding comes from a combination of state funds approved by voters, federal grants to PENNVEST from the Environmental Protection Agency and recycled loan repayments from previous PENNVEST funding awards. Funds for the projects are disbursed after bills for work are paid and receipts are submitted to PENNVEST.

For more information, visit www.pennvest.state.pa.us or call 717-783-6798.

MEDIA CONTACT: Paul Marchetti, 717-448-0783

A list of project summaries follows.

PENNVEST Drinking Water Projects

Armstrong County
Rayburn Township Joint Municipal Authority received a $4,968,405 grant to construct almost nine miles of water distribution lines, a water storage tank and a pump station in order to provide safe and adequate drinking water to various areas of the township where residents are currently dependent on contaminated wells for their drinking water.

Indiana County
• Central Indiana County Water Authority received a $3,081,000 loan to construct four miles of water distribution lines, a new pump station and other facilities in order to provide adequate and safe drinking water to sixty households and two dairy farms in Center Township.

• Indiana County Municipal Services Authority received a $3,978,721 loan and a $4,236,279 grant to construct more than sixteen miles of new water distribution lines, a pump station and other related facilities in order to provide safe drinking water to approximately 300 homes in both Cherry Hill and Armstrong Townships, where residents are currently dependent on contaminated private wells for their drinking water.

Clearfield and Jefferson Counties
Sykesville Borough received an $85,797 loan and a $3,584,203 grant to replace almost five miles of old and deteriorated water distribution lines and to make other improvements in order to eliminate leaks, frequent water line breaks and low water pressure in various parts of the borough’s system.

Lycoming County
Muncy Borough Municipal Authority received a $5,737,650 loan to construct two water storage tanks and other improvements in order to provide adequate storage to meet the daily water demand at the Muncy Industrial Park and also to eliminate unaccounted for water losses and other problems in the authority’s distribution system.

Schuylkill County
Schuylkill County Municipal Authority received a $6.4 million loan to rehabilitate three deteriorating water storage tanks and also replace about 10,000 water meters in order to improve leak detection throughout the authority’s distribution system.

PENNVEST Wastewater Projects

Allegheny and Washington Counties
Jefferson Hills Borough received a $9,524,050 loan to construct more than two miles of sewage collection lines, and to make other improvements to the borough’s system in order to reduce basement back-ups and wet weather overflows of raw sewage into tributaries of the Monongahela River.

Blair County
Hollidaysburg Sewer Authority received a $4,650,000 loan and a $2,491,500 grant to construct almost six miles of sewage collection lines in order to separate the existing sanitary and storm sewer systems that currently overflow during wet weather and discharge raw sewage into the Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River.

Cambria County
• Johnstown Redevelopment Authority received an $18.5 million loan to construct more than a mile of interceptor sewers in the Hornerstown area of the city in order to eliminate wet weather discharges of raw sewage into Stony Creek River.

• Southmont Borough received an $8,308,574 loan and a $1,648,426 grant to construct more than six miles of sewage collection lines and make other improvements in order to eliminate the discharge of raw sewage into Cheney Run that occurs during wet weather.

Non-point Source Water Quality Improvement Projects

Armstrong and Clarion Counties
Armstrong County Conservation District received a $761,400 grant to install a variety of streambank stabilization measures along 3.5 miles of trails where wet weather is eroding the trail surface and surrounding ground, resulting in sediment being carried into Redbank Creek and the Allegheny River.

Lancaster County
Chester County Conservation District and Samuel Stolzfus received a $314,550 grant to construct new manure management and storage facilities and other improvements on a dairy operation where there is uncontrolled manure runoff from the existing cattle lot. Also, there is currently no manure storage capacity, which results in manure spreading during winter and other times of the year when the soil is relatively impervious. All of these conditions currently cause manure and the nutrients it contains to run off into Octoraro Creek and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.

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