Governor Wolf Announces $236 Million Investment in Water Infrastructure Projects in 15 Counties

October 19, 2022

Governor Tom Wolf today announced the investment of $236 million for 23 drinking water, wastewater, stormwater and non-point source projects across 15 counties through the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PENNVEST).

“I’m encouraged to see continued, increased investments in our clean water infrastructure across the commonwealth, and these awards mark a historic occasion,” said Gov. Wolf. “This round of water quality funding will deliver the first dollars from the Infrastructure Investment & Jobs Act, signed by President Biden in November of 2021. This funding will create generational change in improving our environment and planning for future growth.”

“Clean water is the lifeblood of any community. These projects will help children grow and families thrive by providing safe drinking water and improving water infrastructure to protect public health,” said US Senator Bob Casey. “I’m proud to say that this is just the beginning of water infrastructure funding coming to Pennsylvania thanks to federal investments and the infrastructure law.”

The funding for these projects originates from a combination of state funds approved by voters, Growing Greener, Marcellus Legacy funds, the Infrastructure Investment & Jobs Act, federal grants to PENNVEST from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and recycled loan repayments from previous PENNVEST funding awards.  Funds for these projects are disbursed after expenses for work are paid and receipts are submitted to PENNVEST for review.

This award announcement also includes projects that are addressing emerging contaminants under the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF), which are being funded by the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act for the remediation of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in communities’ water systems across Pennsylvania.  To date, $17,741,000 remains available for emerging contaminants under the DWSRF for the 2022-2023 budget cycle.

“As communities have been planning for the opportunity to take advantage of this momentous federal investment, federal, state, and local partners have ensured that we can distribute this funding efficiently and equitably,” said Gov. Wolf.  “Funding through the Infrastructure Investment & Jobs Act will truly address some of the neediest populations in Pennsylvania with some of the worst legacy environmental issues, including lead contamination and emerging contaminants.  As we continue to ensure that communities have access to this funding, they can in turn ensure that at-risk populations are safe to drink clean water and enjoy their own environmental gifts.”

A list of project summaries follows:

Drinking Water Projects

Allegheny County

  • ***Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Authority – received a $1,349,427 loan and a $6,486,969 grant to replace lead service lines that will affect 752 residential customers in areas where leaking, undersized water mains will also be replaced.  The project will address compliance issues contained within a Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Consent Order and Agreement.
  • *Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Authority – received a $75,529,516 loan to replace approximately 63,000 feet of water lines throughout the distribution system.  The project will address multiple undersized and leaking lines in a system with a historical water loss of 43 percent.
  • *Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Authority – received a $9,978,156 loan to install security upgrades consistent with a recent U.S. Department of Homeland Security risk assessment, including security cameras, electronic access controls, emergency alarm and notification systems, and fencing replacement at multiple sites.  The project will ensure enhanced protection of system water sources and components throughout the service area.

Centre County

  • ***Haines-Aaronsburg Municipal Authority – received a $1,113,420 loan and a $4,819,780 grant to upgrade an existing treatment plant, water source, and distribution system, including the addition of a new drinking well, water mains, and electrical process controls.  The project will improve the system’s ability to produce adequate quantities of drinking water and satisfy requirements of a Consent Order and Agreement with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.
  • Walker Township Water Association – received a $5,920,000 loan to construct an above-ground booster station with new waterlines to direct flow, variable frequency drives to adjust pump speed, and a chlorination skid to maintain chlorine residual.  Upon completion of this project, the booster station will convey potable water from the Snydertown Pressure Zone to the Hecla and Zion Pressure Zones, to provide reliable delivery of safe drinking water for the service area.

Crawford County

  • ***Linesville Borough – received a $2,792,754 loan and a $3,244,975 grant to implement numerous enhancements to an existing water distribution system and water supply sources.  A new pump station will be constructed at Penn Street; a water line extension along Homestead Avenue and a new tank mixer at the Airport site will be installed; and the Borough Garage tank and pump station will be relocated from Bunday Street to a non-flood area.  The project will ensure reliable sources and delivery of potable water with the reduction of contamination, stagnation, and ice buildup within the system.

Erie County

  • ***Erie City Water Authority – received a $3,099,600 loan and a $14,900,400 grant to replace approximately 2,700 service connections consisting of cast iron pipe attached to water mains by lead goosenecks.  The project will eliminate the risk of lead contamination throughout the service area and increase reliability of service.

Lancaster County

  • Weaverland Valley Authority – received an $899,739 loan to install a new well pump to increase the capacity of the existing well to 145 gallons-per-minute, and a new connection between the current Twin Springs distribution system and the Blue Ball distribution system.  The project will provide a redundant water source for the service area, increasing system adequacy and safety.

Luzerne County

  • Greater Hazleton Community Area New Development Organization, Inc. – received a $3,500,000 loan to install an oxidation and pressure filtration system to reduce iron and manganese to acceptable levels and make improvements to the existing disinfection and oxidation process.  The project will address an existing compliance order from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and contribute to the elimination of a critical public health hazard.
  • ***Hazleton City Authority – received a $2,275,000 loan to construct a new booster pump station near the intersection of State Routes 424 and 309 in Hazle Township.  The project will contribute to a more sustainable water capacity and increased water pressure for a developing portion of the service area.

Mercer County

  • ***Borough of Sharpsville – received a $3,805,859 loan and a $5,994,141 grant to replace approximately 20,000 feet of aging waterlines prone to routine breaks, leaks, and loss of pressure.  The project will increase system reliability and reduce water loss, and will positively impact Sharpsville Container Corporation and Barber’s Chemicals, which serve as major manufacturing employers in the region.

Montgomery County

  • ***Aqua Pennsylvania, Inc. – received a $5,523,000 grant to install ion exchange absorption units for the removal of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) contamination in Hatboro Well Nos. 6 and 8.  The project will bring the facility into regulatory compliance with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection’s anticipated maximum contaminant levels for PFOA and PFOS.

Venango County

  • *Cranberry-Venango County General Authority – received a $2,636,675 loan to construct a new 350 gallons-per-minute water filtration unit at the existing Cranberry Mall water treatment plant.  Along with the installation of compatible treatment equipment and upgrades to the building’s current electrical and HVAC systems, the project will ensure reliable drinking water quality and production to meet the projected demands of a growing service area.

Wastewater Projects

Allegheny County

  • **Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Authority – received a $46,054,410 loan to replace approximately 3,600 inlets and catch basins that collect stormwater throughout combined sewer areas.  The project will replace failing sewer system infrastructure that is approximately 100 years old and will address a Corrective Action Plan issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.

Delaware County

  • **Central Delaware County Authority – received a $16,452,900 loan to re-line approximately 60,000 feet of aging, cracked sanitary sewer interceptors with cured-in-place piping and replace 288 manholes.  The project will reduce leakage of untreated sewage into local groundwater and increase the efficiency of sewage transport.

Franklin County

  • ***Hamilton Township Municipal Authority – received a $1,243,000 loan to upgrade approximately 6,050 feet of sanitary sewer force main, and reroute and reconnect the replacement main to avoid wetlands near the pump station it connects to currently.  The project will update an aging system, enabling operation at intended capacity and reducing potential wet weather overflows.

Lawrence County

  • ***Borough of Ellwood City – received a $6,000,000 grant to construct a new pump station with approximately 2,300 feet of gravity sewer line, and an additional 5,200 feet of force main to connect a federally-disadvantaged portion of the service area to the Borough’s existing primary lift station.  The project will significantly reduce the risk of raw sewage contaminating the Connoquenessing Creek, a tributary of the Beaver River.

Somerset County

  • Jenner Area Joint Sewer Authority – received a $5,202,500 loan to replace the headworks of an existing treatment system and install additional piping and two new digester tanks to include sludge pumping and blowers.  The project will eliminate discharge into the Quemahoning Creek, a cold water fishery, through improved debris removal, rerouting of wastewater flows, and controlled chemical treatment.

Union County

  • **Lewis Township – received a $1,286,330 loan and a $2,787,978 grant to rehabilitate and expand an existing wastewater treatment plant into an aerobic digester system and eliminate the Marsh and Meadow system treatment process.  The project will increase system capacity by more than 11,000 gallons-per-day and will address public health concerns as malfunctioning onlot systems in the community will be decommissioned.

Westmoreland County

  • West Newton Borough – received a $714,000 loan to replace a sewer line that collapsed in a section of a street under a railroad crossing, causing sewer backups in basements of several customers in the service area.  The project will replace a system at the end of useful life.

Stormwater Projects

Lancaster County

  • Stehli Mill, LLC – received a $1,859,676 loan to install 3,752 feet of storm sewer piping, filters, and infiltration basins at the historic 11-acre Stehli Silk Mill property.  The project will significantly reduce stormwater runoff into the City of Lancaster’s combined sewer system and prevent future overflows from entering the Conestoga River.


Non-Point Source Projects

Lancaster County

  • **Lancaster County Conservation District – received a $467,800 loan to install a manure stacking structure, storage tank, and 3,200 feet of streambank fencing at the Christ Miller dairy farm in Bart Township.  The project will reduce approximately 4,083 pounds of sediment, 4,969 pounds of nitrogen, and 2,149 pounds of phosphorus annually from Nickel Mines Run, which is an impaired waterway.
  • **Lancaster County Conservation District – received a $683,500 grant to install a manure storage tank, underfloor waste storage system, and 220 feet of streambank fencing at the Benuel Stoltzfus dairy farm in Bart Township.  The project will reduce an estimated 2,451 pounds of sediment, 5,168 pounds of nitrogen, and 2,247 pounds of phosphorus annually, from Nickel Mines Run, which serves as a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay.

* denotes projects that have Drinking Water State Revolving Funds

** denotes projects that are funded with Clean Water State Revolving Funds

*** denotes projects that are funded by the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act

Governor Wolf has served for two terms as a leader consistently at work for the people of Pennsylvania. Learn more about how his Priorities for Pennsylvania have fueled the commonwealth’s comeback, leaving Pennsylvania in a much better place than when he arrived.

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